• Rejoice in the Lord always: again I will say, rejoice. (Phil. 4:4 NKJV)

    Restore to me the joy of your salvation and grant me a willing spirit to sustain me. (Psalm 51:12)

    Have you ever felt like you are just wasting away, like your strength is sapped? The normal Christian life is a life of joy. Yet many (if not most) Christians are not consistently joyful. What is it that keeps us from obeying the command to rejoice always? Often, it is unconfessed and unrepented sin that hinders us from living a life of joy.

    In this short booklet, Jim Wilson shares the story of his early Christian walk and his journey towards understanding the connection between repentance and rejoicing in the Lord. With Scripture, graphs, and clear explanations, he helps us see how failure to confess sins quickly steals our joy and how keeping short accounts—both with God and with others—sets us free to rejoice in the Lord no matter the circumstances.

  • *Looking for the $2 booklet version of this title? Click here.* Bitterness often grows out of a small offense - perhaps a passing word, an accidental shove, or a pair of dirty socks left in the middle of the living room floor. Yet when bitterness takes root in our hearts, its effects are anything but small. In this collection of short articles, Jim Wilson and others discuss what it means to live as "imitators of God." As the Apostle Paul says in Ephesians, we have been called to leave the bitterness and anger of the world and instead embrace the love and compassion of our God. The authors remind us that we are to forgive others just as we have been forgiven, pointing to Scriptural admonitions and examples as they offer sound teaching on the trials and temptations of everyday life. Want the audiobook? Get it on Audible here.
  • In Christianity and all religions that claim to be Christian, there is a promise of salvation. The promise may be conditional, or it may be positive, but it will be based on either doctrine or works. This booklet gives nine biblical, experiential evidences of salvation. When a person compares his experiences with those described in the Bible, he may come to one of several conclusions:
    • He thought he was not saved, but he finds out that he is.
    • He thought he was saved, but finds out he isn't.
    • He thought he was not saved, and that is confirmed.
    • He thought he was saved, and now he knows that he is.
    "These things I have written to you who believe in the name of the Son of God, that you may know that you have eternal life." (1 John 5:13a)
  • Vincit qui se vincit
    “He conquers who conquers himself.”
    Is it ok to be in the military and be moral? The answer is yes. In the early 1950s, my ship left San Diego for the Western Pacific. We had eighteen “boots” aboard. The captain decided that these young men needed to be protected, and should be informed of the facts of life. It was a three-pronged effort. The exec talked to the men in a fatherly sort of way about their mothers, their sisters, their hometown girlfriends, and their wives. This nostalgia was to protect them from waywardness. An “assigned” chaplain talked with them about absolute morality and sin. And finally, the medical officer and the corpsman taught them about condoms and “past event cleansing.” ... The training had left out the effects of peer pressure... This essay was first written for the U.S. Naval Institute Prize Essay Contest. Because of the gross moral lapses in the U.S. military in the last few decades, I thought I should prepare it for distribution to our future leaders. It is dedicated to the future military leadership of the United States. - James I. Wilson
  • Jesus’ death paid for our sins - the guilt, the death, and the punishment. Jesus does not repay the man who got ripped off when we stole from him. According to the Bible, the person who comes to the Lord in repentance is to pay the one he stole from the value of the stolen goods plus one fifth of the value. But what if it is a candy bar you took twenty years ago? The amount stolen and the time since the theft do not make it yours. There are many Christians who are living subnormal Christian lives because they are too proud or too afraid to make restitution. They are like people with low-grade fevers; they are not sick enough to be in bed, but too sick to do anything worthwhile. Even if no one knows about the thefts, these Christians are poor witnesses for Jesus Christ. They may have confessed and repented in words, but if they do not make restitution, it is not true repentance, and they are not forgiven.
  • Dead and Alive

    $4.99$12.00

    Disobedience. It’s normal, right? For hundreds of years, the Church has struggled with how to overcome sin in the Christian life. We know that the cross takes care of our past sins at salvation and assures us life after death. But what do we do with the time in between? Many Christians go through life sinning and confessing, sinning and confessing, but they never get beyond that. Is that better than sinning and not confessing? Absolutely: but it is not enough if you want to grow.

    Contrary to most evangelical teaching today, Christian obedience is meant to be glad-hearted, willing, and normal. In Dead and Alive, Jim Wilson discusses the neglected requirement of obedience and explains God’s provision for it from Scripture. May the thoughts in it lead you into a victorious, obedient life in Christ.

    "But just as he who called you is holy, so be holy in all you do; for it is written: 'Be holy, because I am holy.'” (1 Pet. 1:15–16)

  • In the study of warfare, great men have concluded that there are some overriding principles which, if followed, will always tend toward success in battle, and if neglected or ignored, will tend toward defeat or even destruction. These principles have been entitled the "principles of war." But not all warfare is waged on a battlefield: every Christian is called to be a soldier. Our fight is against Satan, our objective is the acknowledgment and fulfillment of God's commands, and our ammunition is the power of the Holy Spirit. In Principles of War, Jim Wilson outlines the time-tried, fundamental principles of war and explains how we can employ them in our daily spiritual battles as we fight a war which our commander in chief has already won for us.
  • A Handbook on Personal Evangelism Even if communities understand how to follow the principles of spiritual warfare, the actually winning of souls usually occurs on the personal level. Big-picture evangelistic strategy must be complemented by an understanding of personal evangelism. Weapons & Tactics teaches individual Christians how to apply the evangelistic principles described in Principles of War. Using thorough analysis of Scripture and real-life examples, Jim Wilson provides insight on spiritual weapons (what God has given us to fight with) and tactics (the effective use of those weapons) with simple, powerful language. Weapons & Tactics calls us to personal, life-changing obedience as we follow our captain in the fight.
  • New Devotional Readings - Who We Are & What We Do in Christ Being Christian has St. Paul's ambitious goal: to present every person perfect in Christ. With that in mind, this wide-ranging devotional is full of strong texts and short teaching, all organized into bite-size readings. You will find applicable wisdom on every page, as Being Christian is the product of Jim Wilson's practical advice and scriptural meditation over the past thirty-five years. Throughout every chapter you will read a huge variety of powerful, concentrated Scriptures, covering fundamental topics like prayer, evangelism, everyday holiness, joy, love, family, and (of course) what it means to be a Christian. "Strong teaching makes strong Christians. And it makes soft-hearted, tender, loving Christians. But soft teaching makes hard, callused Christians. Soft teaching is for people who have itching ears. They do not wish to have their lives interfered with." ~ JIM WILSON, from the preface

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