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  • “Oh, the depth of the riches and wisdom and knowledge of God!” (Rom. 11:33). Our heavenly Father has given us unfathomable blessings, but we often fail to live as if they are truly ours. In thankfulness and Confession, Brad Scheelke encourages readers to meditate on and rejoice in the glorious riches of our inheritance in Christ. As we regularly give thanks for what God has given us, our thoughts and actions will begin to change . . . often in surprising ways. Gratitude also changes how we deal with sin. When we confess our sin, bringing it into the light of Christ’s riches, we now see not only the darkness of our own evil, but also the beauty of God’s holiness and grace. When we learn to practice thankfulness and confession in this way, our hearts will overflow in joy, in love for one another, and in glory to God.
  • Rejoice in the Lord always: again I will say, rejoice. (Phil. 4:4 NKJV)

    Restore to me the joy of your salvation and grant me a willing spirit to sustain me. (Psalm 51:12)

    Have you ever felt like you are just wasting away, like your strength is sapped? The normal Christian life is a life of joy. Yet many (if not most) Christians are not consistently joyful. What is it that keeps us from obeying the command to rejoice always? Often, it is unconfessed and unrepented sin that hinders us from living a life of joy.

    In this short booklet, Jim Wilson shares the story of his early Christian walk and his journey towards understanding the connection between repentance and rejoicing in the Lord. With Scripture, graphs, and clear explanations, he helps us see how failure to confess sins quickly steals our joy and how keeping short accounts—both with God and with others—sets us free to rejoice in the Lord no matter the circumstances.

  • *Note: This is the bound-book edition; the content is the same as the magazine-format edition.* Bitterness often grows out of a small offense - perhaps a passing word, an accidental shove, or a pair of dirty socks left in the middle of the living room floor. Yet when bitterness takes root in our hearts, its effects are anything but small. In this collection of short articles, Jim Wilson and others discuss what it means to live as "imitators of God." As the Apostle Paul says in Ephesians, we have been called to leave the bitterness and anger of the world and instead embrace the love and compassion of our God. The authors remind us that we are to forgive others just as we have been forgiven, pointing to Scriptural admonitions and examples as they offer sound teaching on the trials and temptations of everyday life. Want the audiobook? Get it on Audible here.
  • In Christianity and all religions that claim to be Christian, there is a promise of salvation. The promise may be conditional, or it may be positive, but it will be based on either doctrine or works. This booklet gives nine biblical, experiential evidences of salvation. When a person compares his experiences with those described in the Bible, he may come to one of several conclusions:
    • He thought he was not saved, but he finds out that he is.
    • He thought he was saved, but finds out he isn't.
    • He thought he was not saved, and that is confirmed.
    • He thought he was saved, and now he knows that he is.
    "These things I have written to you who believe in the name of the Son of God, that you may know that you have eternal life." (1 John 5:13a)
  • Vincit qui se vincit
    “He conquers who conquers himself.”
    Is it ok to be in the military and be moral? The answer is yes. In the early 1950s, my ship left San Diego for the Western Pacific. We had eighteen “boots” aboard. The captain decided that these young men needed to be protected, and should be informed of the facts of life. It was a three-pronged effort. The exec talked to the men in a fatherly sort of way about their mothers, their sisters, their hometown girlfriends, and their wives. This nostalgia was to protect them from waywardness. An “assigned” chaplain talked with them about absolute morality and sin. And finally, the medical officer and the corpsman taught them about condoms and “past event cleansing.” ... The training had left out the effects of peer pressure... This essay was first written for the U.S. Naval Institute Prize Essay Contest. Because of the gross moral lapses in the U.S. military in the last few decades, I thought I should prepare it for distribution to our future leaders. It is dedicated to the future military leadership of the United States. - James I. Wilson
  • Jesus’ death paid for our sins - the guilt, the death, and the punishment. Jesus does not repay the man who got ripped off when we stole from him. According to the Bible, the person who comes to the Lord in repentance is to pay the one he stole from the value of the stolen goods plus one fifth of the value. But what if it is a candy bar you took twenty years ago? The amount stolen and the time since the theft do not make it yours. There are many Christians who are living subnormal Christian lives because they are too proud or too afraid to make restitution. They are like people with low-grade fevers; they are not sick enough to be in bed, but too sick to do anything worthwhile. Even if no one knows about the thefts, these Christians are poor witnesses for Jesus Christ. They may have confessed and repented in words, but if they do not make restitution, it is not true repentance, and they are not forgiven.
  • We love our kids, but do we love like God loves....without conditions, reservations, or reluctance? In this excerpt from his popular book How to be Free from Bitterness, Jim Wilson identifies the troublesome consequences of insufficient parental love and points readers to the glorious fruit of superabundant kindness, and patience and helps parents apply the eternal truths of Scripture to grow peace and joy in their homes.
  • Men were designed, created, and commanded to bear responsibility, but our history of failure in this area stretches all the way back to Adam. Today irresponsibility is considered normal, even a birthright. Jim Wilson outlines the causes and results of this failure, the biblical principles and characteristics that define a responsible man, and how men can apply them both in their own lives and in raising their sons.

    Masculinity does not have to be proved with muscularity, sexual prowess, or bragging. True masculinity is established by taking up the responsibility God has given you.

  • You love God. You love your kids. So why don’t they love Him? God promises lovingkindness to a thousand generations for families who love and obey Him (Deut. 7:9). Why are children who grew up in Christian homes leaving the faith, and how do we get them to come back? No matter how old your children are, there is a solution. With decades of pastoral wisdom, Jim Wilson identifies the common causes of rebellion and helps parents apply the eternal truths of Scripture to “turn the hearts of the parents to their children and the disobedient to the wisdom of the righteous—to make ready a people prepared for the Lord” (Luke 1:17).
  • Bitterness can spring from a small offense, but once it takes root, its effects are devastating. You can see bitterness in people’s eyes. You can hear it in the tone of their voice. It pervades everything, and they wouldn’t know what to do if they got rid of it. But God requires us to maintain a tender heart. Therefore, the bitterness must go. In order to get rid of bitterness, I have to see that it is evil, and that it is my sin and my sin only. I do not get rid of it through the other person saying he is sorry. I do not get rid of it if the other person quits or dies. I do not get rid of it any other way except calling it sin against the holy God, confessing it, and receiving forgiveness. The difficulty is in getting my eyes off the other person’s sin. But just the fact that I think it is his problem shows that it is not. If it were his problem, and I was filled with sweetness and light, and not bitter, then I would be concerned about the other person. I could say, “That poor guy! Look what he did. If I did something like that, I would feel awful. He must really feel awful. I think I will go help him.” But if that is not my response, then I am bitter, and it is my sin, not his. I believe that this sin is a major hindrance to revival in this country. When Christians start confessing their sins, they will be able to forgive the sins of others. Jim Wilson Since 1990, this book has been read by hundreds of thousands of people in English and many other languages. If you are interested in translating it, let us know by emailing ccm@moscow.com. Want the audiobook? Get it on Audible here
  • Naval Academy midshipman Jim Wilson didn't cuss or smoke or chew or go with girls who do. When a friend asked him if he was going to heaven, Jim replied, "If someone like me can't make it, heaven is going to be thinly populated." It was a serious answer, but his friend laughed. Jim was in for a surprise: Turns out you have to be bad to go to heaven.

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